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Your Linkedin Network Can Find You A New Job

27 November 2019

How to make the best use of your LinkedIn profile as a passive tool to aid your job search.

Not every candidate I speak to is convinced that it's worth the bother of spending time and effort to develop their LinkedIn Profile.

What I tell people is that it's a worthwhile investment so that you have an extra tool in the box when it comes to finding your next opportunity. Recruiters & Hiring Managers are constantly using LinkedIn as one of their sources of new talent, and if you aren't selling your skills and experience to the full you may be missing out on opportunities that you will never find out about otherwise.

There are of course other professional networking sites in competition with LinkedIn - such as Google+, Plaxo, Xing, ecademy etc. However many people think that Linkedin is currently ahead of the others due to the size of its database and the fact that its structure lends itself to effective candidate searching.

I can give you some tips that you can use to start developing your profile right now. You don't have to do everything at once but it's a good idea to have a plan to complete all of the work within as short a time frame as you can manage - then you can sit back and wait for the opportunities to come your way.

Ensure you can be found easily. •Make your profile public. If you have duplicate profiles then consolidate them, archive those not required and make sure there is only one version that can be found when searching. •Join any relevant groups – don't be afraid to create a new group if any of your areas of interest are not currently catered for. You can join up to 50 groups, making it more likely that you will be contacted by anyone looking for experience in particular industries or technologies. •Register all email addresses that may be used to send you connection requests - not doing this is a major reason why people accidentally create duplicate profiles in the first place. Ensure you include a personal email address so that you don't lose control of the profile when you move to a new employer. •Create a vanity URL for your LinkedIn profile & promote it in your email signature and on other social media pages etc. Once someone finds your profile, are you selling yourself well enough? •Your profile picture should be a business-like head and shoulders shot. •The summary section should be concise, engaging & specific •In the specialities section you can include any relevant keywords that recruiters and hiring managers may be searching for. •In the biography it's easy to copy and paste info from your CV/resume - you can add more detail if required; there's no need to worry so much about the amount of text as you would with a document. •Get recommendations for work you've done from current and former managers, peers and clients - as long as you can do so without arousing suspicion from your current employers if they don't know you're looking to move on. If you'd like an impartial assessment of how well your current LinkedIn profile is working for you and some specific pointers on what you could do to improve it, do get in touch with us ASAP.

Are you thinking of accepting a counter-offer from your current employer Read this first!

27 November 2019

Are you considering a counter-offer from your current employer?

 

Nowadays very few people will work for a single employer for their whole working life. You will likely change employer a number of times during your career and even change the entire direction of your career once or more.

 

When you receive a job offer and hand in your notice to your current employer they may have a policy that they will not make a counter-offer. They may feel that their policies are equitable and fair, and they reject "counteroffer coercion" as it feels like blackmail. However some companies will try to induce you to stay on board by offering a higher salary, better benefits, a promotion or better conditions. After all, it’s less expensive and easier for them to make a counter offer than to try and find a replacement at short notice. Do you want to hang around and be seen as the cheap option?

 

You can expect to hear these kind of comments from your boss when you tell them you’re leaving:

 

“We had no idea you weren’t happy – let’s talk to see what we can do to make you change your mind.”

“You’re in line to be given new and exciting responsibilities.”

“I wanted to tell you about the plans we have for your career but they’ve been embargoed until now.”

 

In fact your bosses thoughts are probably more along the lines of:

 

“If I can keep them on for a while it buys me more time to find a replacement.”

“I’m worried that team morale will suffer if this employee leaves.”

“If I lose this person I’ll look bad and it will hurt me in my next appraisal.”

 

If you’re tempted to accept the counter-offer and turn your back on the new opportunity, ensure that your present employer confirms all the details in writing. But before you even get to the point of receiving a counter-offer here are some things to consider prior to making a decision that you could come to regret.

 

Breakdown of trust.

Your employer now knows that you have been sufficiently dissatisfied with your current position that you’ve been through the whole process of searching for and applying for a new job. If you do decide to stick with the devil you know, your boss could resent having been put in the position of trying to hang on to you. They may now also question your loyalty, and any time you book a day off there would be a lingering suspicion that you are attending another interview. Your co-workers may also resent you as they perceive you’ve got a huge raise at the expense of the measly one they get at the next review.

 

Burning bridges

Your new employer had made arrangements for you joining, told the rest of the employees about their new colleague and planned your induction. They will have halted their recruitment process which they’ll now have to restart, and they may even have allowed your predecessor to leave. Put yourself in their position and imagine how you’d feel if they’d withdrawn your offer and pulled the rug out from under your feet.

 

Future promotion prospects.

When deciding who gets the big internal opportunity, your boss will certainly take into account the fact that you were on your way out of the door at one point. You may be offered a “promotion” as part of a counter-offer but there’s a good chance you’re just getting a slightly different job title while doing exactly the same job. Your boss might promise a review of structures over coming months but more often than not time goes by and nothing changes for the better.

 

Risk of redundancy

Next time the market takes a dive you will be high in the list of people whose jobs are no longer available. This is an unmissable opportunity for your employer to get rid of you without it looking like revenge.

 

The salary increase is just your next raise brought forward

At the next salary review you may get next to no uplift, but by then you have already used up your bargaining power. Why did you have to threaten to quit before they would pay what you’re worth or address your concerns?

 

You just priced yourself out of a job

Your salary increase could just be a way of the company buying time until they can replace you with someone cheaper.

 

Remember the reasons why you were looking in the first place.

You didn’t start your job search just to get a higher salary – will that raise make it easier to endure the factors that led you to hand in your notice? Conditions simply become slightly more tolerable short term because of the promises, promotion or salary increase the employer came up with to keep you.

People who’ve regretted accepting a counter offer give the following advice: list all of the things that bother you about your current situation and read it back to yourself before you meet your boss to hand him your resignation letter.

 

Most people who accept counter offers leave soon in any case.

The majority (80%) will either quit anyway or lose their job within 6-12 months - do you fancy those odds?

 

The best way to avoid all of the problems above is to anticipate a counter offer and state that, after much deliberation, your decision is final. You should state your decision in your resignation letter, and communicate it verbally to your manager. This needn’t be unpleasant; you can reiterate that you will do everything possible to make the transition easy for them. Moving the focus away from you and back to them will allow them to deal with your resignation and move forward.

 

In summary: while there are rare occasions where accepting a counteroffer may benefit the employee, in the vast majority of instances it’s career suicide.

Your Linkedin Network Can Find You A New Job

24/11/2016

How to make the best use of your LinkedIn profile as a passive tool to aid your jobsearch.

Not every candidate I speak to is convinced that it's worth the bother of spending time and effort to develop their LinkedIn Profile.

What I tell people is that it's a worthwhile investment so that you have an extra tool in the box when it comes to finding your next opportunity. Recruiters & Hiring Managers are constantly using LinkedIn as one of their sources of new talent, and if you aren't selling your skills and experience to the full you may be missing out on opportunities that you will never find out about otherwise.

There are of course other professional networking sites in competition with LinkedIn - such as Google+, Plaxo, Xing, ecademy etc. However many people think that Linkedin is currently ahead of the others due to the size of its database and the fact that its structure lends itself to effective candidate searching.

I can give you some tips that you can use to start developing your profile right now. You don't have to do everything at once but it's a good idea to have a plan to complete all of the work within as short a time frame as you can manage - then you can sit back and wait for the opportunities to come your way.

Ensure you can be found easily. •Make your profile public. If you have duplicate profiles then consolidate them, archive those not required and make sure there is only one version that can be found when searching. •Join any relevant groups – don't be afraid to create a new group if any of your areas of interest are not currently catered for. You can join up to 50 groups, making it more likely that you will be contacted by anyone looking for experience in particular industries or technologies. •Register all email addresses that may be used to send you connection requests - not doing this is a major reason why people accidentally create duplicate profiles in the first place. Ensure you include a personal email address so that you don't lose control of the profile when you move to a new employer. •Create a vanity URL for your LinkedIn profile & promote it in your email signature and on other social media pages etc. Once someone finds your profile, are you selling yourself well enough? •Your profile picture should be a business-like head and shoulders shot. •The summary section should be concise, engaging & specific •In the specialities section you can include any relevant keywords that recruiters and hiring managers may be searching for. •In the biography it's easy to copy and paste info from your CV/resume - you can add more detail if required; there's no need to worry so much about the amount of text as you would with a document. •Get recommendations for work you've done from current and former managers, peers and clients - as long as you can do so without arousing suspicion from your current employers if they don't know you're looking to move on. If you'd like an impartial assessment of how well your current LinkedIn profile is working for you and some specific pointers on what you could do to improve it, do get in touch with us ASAP.