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1960s Vintage Clothing - Through The Decades

24/09/2013

The 1960’s was a decade that broke barriers in terms of fashion, especially for women.
 
When purchasing vintage clothes, you are automatically buying into a piece of fashion history, but when buying vintage clothes from the swinging sixties, you really are buying a piece of history that moulded the fashion industry from then in.

The sixties is a decade of fashion that had so many trends that began in the era, that when buying vintage there is so much choice it’s hard to pick.

In the beginning of the decade Jackie Kennedy was still wearing the famous Chanel suits and pillbox hats, a trend that withstood nearly 7 years of season changes, so style was somewhat conservative. However all that changed when Mary Quant, a Welsh designer and British fashion icon developed the mini skirt and encouraged women to hike up their hemlines. The majority of miniskirts or mini dresses had geometric patterns, some often with bell sleeves and/or polo necks.

The ‘space’ look was also an integral part of fashion culture and believe it or not, people donned goggles paired with go go boots and clothes made from PVC or sequins. All these looks were paired with big hair, false eyelashes and pale lipstick.

As the era moved on so did the culture and the fashion, with the hippy trend becoming huge psychedelic patterns were everywhere. Bandanas were paired with bell bottom jeans and paisley prints and the emphasis on having hair as high as the sky wasn’t as important as in previous years.

However, probably one of the most significant trends to ever emerge into fashion, mainly for men, was the mod style. The importance of this new way of dressing is integral to fashion today and is probably one of the main reason why 1960’s vintage fashion is so sought after in today’s day and age, given the fact that men like Paul Weller still make it ‘cool’ to embody the style.

The mod style personified British fashion of the era and very much moulded a new lifestyle as well as dress code. Consisting of tight trousers, anoraks, shirts and ties, the key to pulling it off was combining a smart, gentlemanly look with a small amount of grunge to give an edge. The look was ultimately unisex and the women wore similar clothes and had short cropped hair. 

This style has become something of a timeless classic, which in turn creates a need for vintage originals. The whole scene reeks of the cool element that vintage brings and having a fundamental part of the first release of these fashions seems to be part of the process if you want to be a fully fledged mod. 

Vintage fashion from the sixties is not for the faint hearted, and wearers have to be brave enough to make a statement with their clothes.  When choosing a trend to bring back to life from the sixties it is important to pick the right one, the styles are so iconic that it can sometimes look like fancy dress, the key thing with 1960s vintage clothes is to blend it so it looks kitsch, not cliché.

 

My Vintage are a leading online vintage & retro clothing retailer. Visit http://www.myvintage.co.uk for a wide range of Vintage Clothes & Retro Clothing for men & women.

Copyright 2013, My Vintage. May be reprinted in its entirety with full credit given to My Vintage and a link to www.myvintage.co.uk.

The Right Vintage Handbag - How Do I Choose

25/08/2013

The handbag is an essential accessory for most women, helping us to stylishly carry our essentials - mobile phone, purse, keys and make up. Yet despite its importance in functionality, the vintage handbag is also one of the most essential-and stylistically telling-pieces in fashion. So it's important to consider various features when choosing a vintage handbag, to ensure you get the most out of both its functionality and style. When we see the celebrities and WAGs in the pages of the glossy magazines, they always seem to have just the right handbag for their outfit, style and frame. So how do you choose the right one for you?

Most of us own at least one or two "staple" handbags, which they use everyday and go with most outfits. What's more, most of these vintage handbags end up being neutral in colour-for example, metallics, nudes or plain black. However, choosing a handbag to mesh with most "looks" doesn't mean it has to be boring. Opt for a unique style, while sticking with a neutral colour and you'll still be able to spice up any outfit. Alternatively, kick it up a notch by choosing a vintage handbag with metallic or subtle print detailing.

However, no one ever said your "staple" vintage handbag can't be colourful. If you're not afraid to stand out, opt for bright hues like reds, yellows, blues and greens. And don't always worry about your handbag matching with every outfit. A lot of bright coloured vintage handbags - especially those that are solid coloured-will compliment many different outfits. Just remember not to let your vintage handbag-outfit combination get too busy with prints and bright colours.

When it comes to specific "looks", certain styles of vintage handbags are definitely more appropriate. For instance, if you normally dress up for the office, odds are you'll want a handbag to match. Opt for a structured bag with two top handles for a chic, ladylike look. Popular extras include buckles, padlocks and studding.

On the other hand, if you're trying to achieve a more casual look, pick up a messenger bag (which you can find in everything from canvas to leather). Worn across the body, these bags leave your arms free; but they're certainly more stylish than backpacks. Looking for something hip? Sling a slouchy "boho" style vintage bag over your shoulder. And if your style is a bit edgier, pick up a clutch bag adorned with metal hardware, sequins, diamantes or studs.

Size is another important feature when it comes to choosing a vintage handbag. Ever see anyone walking around with an overstuffed bag? It's not a pretty sight and should be avoided at all costs. Sure, we all have days when we carry around more than usual. But if you typically tote a ton around, you're better off sizing up on your vintage handbag.

That being said, however, you should also consider your own size when choosing a vintage handbag. If you're petite, don't carry around a massive bag that overpowers your frame. Instead, opt for something relative to your size. If you tend to carry around a lot in your purse, size up (at most) to a medium bag. On the other hand, if you're tall or broad, a tiny bag will seem too small. Try one that's on the larger side for a look that's better suited to your frame.

Last but not least, learn to let go when it's time for a new vintage handbag. Many women tend to get attached to their handbags-which is not surprising, considering it accompanies them everywhere. But when holes, worn leather, tears, or frayed stitching start to show, it's time to move on to a new bag. Keeping these few tips in mind when shopping for vintage handbags will ensure you get one that suits not only your functional needs, but also your unique style.

 

My Vintage are a leading online vintage & retro clothing retailer. Visit http://www.myvintage.co.uk for a wide range of Vintage Handbags & Vintage Clothing for men & women.

Copyright 2013, My Vintage. May be reprinted in its entirety with full credit given to My Vintage and a link to http://www.myvintage.co.uk

Through The Decades - 1950s Vintage Fashion

17/07/2013

1950’s vintage fashion summons up images of Grease, Grace Kelly’s iconic lace wedding dress, Marilyn, housewife chic and girls in petticoats sipping milkshakes in shiny diners.

Obviously, this is a somewhat romanticised view but with vintage fashion from the era these are the trends that come through the years. It is survival of the most beautiful and with vintage that comes from the 1950’s; it really is only the best trends that come through today.

At fancy dress parties a few years ago, it was a dead cert that there would be somebody there in some kind of 1950’s fashion in a tribute harking back to the decade. These days, it is perfectly acceptable to wear these clothes in a normal, non-fancy dress setting and look perfectly fashionable.

When epitomising vintage fashion the mind will automatically think of this era, is it is by far one of the most iconic periods of time that stands out in fashion.

The reason it has carried so well is that that it is versatile; this is the key element that makes this era the benchmark for vintage fashion. If women don’t want to wear the iconic full skirt, there is always the ‘Chanel suit’ a combination of a box jacket and straighter skirt that looks sleek and slim, made famous by Jackie Kennedy, who also sported the infamous pill box hat with hers.

Tops and blouses where designed to sit on the waist, paired with a high waisted skirt or a pair of trousers, all looks that are very much ‘in’ now. The idea of showing off the waist now a part of our fashion culture, rather than wearing cuts that sit on the hips made to show off boy like figures that are now becoming defunct.

Cute sweaters, mainly with pearls and beads sewn on were designed to be worn with the famous cone shaped bras, smart straight skirts and kitten heels.

As with every era, the men’s fashion of the fifties was a little less complex than the ladies, with a few staple looks but pretty straight forward staples were a part of their wardrobe.

Men were made to look like gentlemen, with hats being a real staple of an outfit. Preppy, clean cut and masculine were the trends and trousers were worn with cardigans and shirts mainly tucked in. Suits were smart and a little oversized with plain ties and a big overcoat over the top. Ladies, there wasn’t a tracksuit bottom of V-neck t-shirt in sight!

The diversity of principle looks from the 50’s allow it to be worn as vintage in this area as it can be played with, it allows fashion to become fun again and not so serious. The wearer can combine vintage items with modern twists to ensure the look isn’t old fashioned, but more edgy. Hairstyles should be sophisticated and neat, often the thing that sets the whole outfit off for a woman, think pin curls and waves.

However, the real hero of 1950’s vintage fashion is not the dress, it’s not the blouse nor the suit or hat. It’s the mind-set behind the designs.

Clothes that are truly designed with a woman’s body in mind, suits that are tailored to accentuate masculinity and looks that are supposed to bring confidence to people who are encouraged to feel comfortable in their own skin. No matter which vintage look you decide to rock in this era, you can guarantee that the clothes will make your body feel celebrated.

My Vintage are a leading online vintage & retro clothing retailer. Visit My Vintage for a wide range of vintage & retro clothing for men & women.

Copyright 2013, My Vintage. May be reprinted in its entirety with full credit given to My Vintage and a link to www.myvintage.co.uk

Vintage Fashion Is The Way Forward

23/06/2013

If ever you needed an excuse to wear vintage fashion, what better way to show off your attire than to attend one of the numerous vintage and retro events that are organised across the country, and indeed abroad. Vintage and retro fairs are popping up in the blink of an eye, swing balls are held in beautiful dance halls, and vintage tea rooms offer a colourful and authentic setting for an afternoon scone. In New York, the annual Jazz Age Lawn Party is held where the guests dress up in 1920s fashions, dance and browse the various stalls for all the fabulous one of a kind vintage treasures to be had.

It now seems that everyone is enjoying the romance and fantasy of bygone eras... and why wouldn't they? Wearing vintage clothing and vintage accessories is an exciting way to channel the feel of an era through its fashion to the present day. The history and culture of the time is almost woven into the garments, which means that vintage fashion is not only about the look, it's about the story and history behind the fabric. The roaring twenties marked a period of prosperity and new opportunities for women: they were given the right to vote, many started working and women were able to compete for the first time in Olympic field events. The 1960s saw Audrey Hepburn starring in classics such as Breakfast at Tiffany's and My Fair Lady. The iconic black Givenchy dress that she wore in the former is said to have been auctioned off for a massive £410,000 recently. So when people buy vintage fashion, they are not only interested in the garment itself, they want to feel that they own a piece of the story that it embodies.

Wearing vintage clothing and accessories is also a great way to experiment and use your fashion know-how to create a fabulous outfit. No amount of high street and department store shopping can compare with the joy of coming across a fabulous vintage gem. Nowadays it is often thought that new is best, and although this may be the case with technology, it is certainly not true of vintage fashion. After browsing through an array of colourful garments, each completely different from the last, you'll soon find the exquisite piece that is perfect for you. Once you've converted to vintage fashion, there is no going back. Or should that be forward?

My Vintage are a leading online vintage & retro clothing retailer. Visit www.myvintage.co.uk for a wide range of vintage & retro clothing for men & women.

Copyright 2013, My Vintage. May be reprinted in its entirety with full credit given to My Vintage and a link to www.myvintage.co.uk

Vintage Fashion Summer 2012 – Vintage Clothing Trend Report

18/06/2012

Well we've had a little taste of summer already and lets hope there is plenty more sunshine to come! But whether you are going to be travelling abroad, checking out the festivals or staying at home, we've got the ultimate guide to wearing the summer's biggest trends with a vintage twist!
 
Animal Magic
Animal prints are always around in some shape or form, at this summer they are best worn with bright neon shades. Think leopard print leggings with a fluro pink shirt or a bright lime green frock with a zebra belt. Look for 80s and 90s vintage animal print pieces to mix up with high street favourites for a unique on trend look. And don't forget animal icon prints – anything that features birds, butterflies, swans or any manifestation of a creature is really big news so keep your eyes peeled on the website for some original treasures.

Aztec Tribal
Whether it's embroidered, sequinned, beaded or printed, if it's aztec or tribal then it gets the thumbs up for summer! Lots of gorgeous tones of acid green, terracotta and caramel give a real African feel as well as feather prints and geometric designs. You can pick up some great 1970s vintage pieces with a bit of tribal or ethnic detailing and can also team high street tops with vintage skirts and trousers. Also look out for vintage scarves with Aztec prints as these are great all year round.
 
Bold Tropical Florals
There is always a place for floral prints somewhere in our wardrobe, but this time round it's all about the bold and tropical. Bright colours, huge patterns and a real Honolulu feel! Look for vintage tropical print dresses from the 1950s and plain 1960s shift tops to wear with bold floral trousers. And of course you can pick up some outrageous 1980s floral gear in many different styles. Anything goes with this trend so don't be afraid to clash different floral prints together for an even more unique look!
 
Colour Blocking
Stylish and chic, colour blocking is one of the easiest and more effective trends to pull off. Bold colour separates can be found in vintage clothing and on the high street and there is no end to the combinations you can make. Try a royal blue knot top with a cerise pink mini skirt, a mint green dress with a purple belt and orange bag or even go patriotic with a red dress, white jacket and blue shoes. Mix it up and experiment, who knows what you might come up with!

Pretty Pastels
Whether it's prim and proper 1950s vintage clothing or more casual 1980s denims, pastels are a great feminine look for spring/summer 2012.  Grab an original pastel prom dress, some peachy skinny jeans or a lemon cropped jacket and mix up with creams and whites for a carefree pretty look. Vintage twinsets and pearls are also made cool again with this girly resurgence.
 
Scarf Prints
Based around the amazing Versace, the scarf print trend is massive. Opulent golds and rich regal colours with coin, chain and rope prints look amazing on shirts, blouses, jackets and more! You can get amazing original vintage scarves as well as an array of vintage scarf print items. Mix them up with jeans, shorts, skirts and accessories for the cool extravagant Versace vibe! It's very Jessie J and we love it! We've also got some original vintage Versace too so keep your eyes peeled!
 
Viva Las Vegas
This is very much about the bling! Full on Las Vegas sequins, white dresses, red lips and big hair! We might even allow a few American flags for good measure! It's great to glam up for the evening and if you call it Las Vegas style it just gives you an excuse to go OTT! Look for vintage cocktail dresses, sequinned belts, rhinestones and big collars. Make it loud, proud and all American! 

So there's our rundown on the latest trends with a little sprinkling of vintage!
 
Copyright 2012, My Vintage - Vintage and retro clothes. May be reprinted in its entirety with full credit given to My Vintage and a link to www.myvintage.co.uk

1950s Vintage Fashion - A Decade Of Style

24/01/2012

The 1950's were exciting years in the world of fashion. Following a period of imposed frugality during the war, the media was highlighting glamour that had never been seen before so widely, and the effects that Hollywood would have on the way that women dressed during this period was to create an impact that no-one could have anticipated.


The early fifties saw the introduction of more ladies into the workplace, and the styles that were created for day to day wear included suits with a tailored look, skirts that hugged waistlines, and blouses that were worn discreetly under tailored jackets that were pulled in at the waist to give a flattering and glamorous look that accentuated shape and style.


The hourglass figure became the ideal as stylised by actresses like Marilyn Monroe, or took on the Audrey Hepburn demure and sophistication. Gone were the financial restraints of the war torn world, and the availability of materials was widened, meaning that the beginnings of mass production of affordable fashion was guaranteed to be a success.


The Festival of Britain exhibition in 1951 was to exhibit fabrics that had never been used before in the western world and the beginnings of a new era that was to shape the fashion industry's future began from humble beginnings, though flourished because women were no longer thought of as housewives, and although many remained faithful to the society image of the mother in the home, a certain element of glamour became not only the norm, but an acceptable part of life for women all over the world.


Higher standards of manufacture were employed by companies like Marks and Spencer whose trademark for producing quality items shone, and the high streets began to sport those designs that had otherwise been beyond the price bracket of ordinary people, many of whom had resorted to making their own clothing, simply because of lack of availability.


Designers of the times such as Dior and Givenchy went away from the traditional towards new beginnings introducing shapes that emphasised the silhouette of a woman's shape, rather than boning clothing in the uncomfortable manner of the 40s, realising that women wanted glamour though also wanted functional clothing that was more comfortable and easier to wear.


The world was looking at example, and nowhere was this more common than here in England where a man named Hartnell designed the clothing that would be worn by the young Princess Elizabeth who would be crowned in the early fifties and was appearing on television in homes all over the globe, influencing the way people perceived fashion available to the masses, whereas once it had only been available to those that could afford designs by Fashion houses like Christian Dior.


The fifties brought a new prosperity to the world, and also the vision of Hollywood greats, and the availability of cinema as one of the most popular forms of entertainment, which would influence women worldwide to the glamorous looks and style of their favourite stars.


Music was not exempt from it's followers either, and the rock 'n' roll era was to make a split in fashion styles, taking women away from the traditional to the Teddy Boy styles that went hand in hand with jiving and lindyhopping. Here, the sporting of pony tails became popular with younger women, and even though this style broke away from the neat hairstyles of the day, the clothing style for women was every bit as feminine and glamorous with full skirts, emphasised waistlines, and subtle colour to fabrics.


With the availability of silks, cottons and natural fabrics, many home dressmakers were taking their ideals from magazines and media and translating these into creations, using the patterns supplied by the biggest manufacturers of dress patterns of the day, such as Vogue, Simplicity and Butterick, who had made the glamour styles available to those who wished to pursue the fashion style themselves without buying.


The Chanel style of suit was to become a popularised style and one that was creatively changed and modified to suit either the tall lady or the shorter lady, using different lengths and fabrics to achieve a totally different look, while keeping the neckline and open front of jackets in the traditional Chanel style, braided at the edges with contrasting material and worn with lightweight sweaters and blouses.


The shoes worn within this period of history by women of the time were elegant and were modelled on designs from Italy, dainty footed, and with heels that were slim, and even those breakaway girls that joined in with the rock 'n' roll crowd, sported the heels to complement their outfits, only turning to more casual shoes and bobby socks in the late fifties.


This was a period that set up standards that would be followed by traditionalists for 20 years, and that set standards that are still perceived as glamorous to this day, when we are reminded of the stars of Hollywood and the impact that they had on society's perception of what women should look like, and what style declared femininity. Even the coats of the era were impressive styles that have been re-designed over the ages, though which have kept their standing as classical designs that work.


Copyright 2012, My Vintage. May be reprinted in its entirety with full credit given to My Vintage and a link to www.myvintage.co.uk.

The Vintage Party Dress - The Ultimate Guide!

23/11/2011

By far one of the most popular and desirable items of vintage clothing is the vintage party dress. Whether it be for the high school prom, hot date, music festival or party of the year, vintage party dresses are where it's at! But did you know that there are actually eight different types of party dress? Yes that's right eight! Where do you start? Well with our one stop vintage party dress guide we will take you through each and every style and give you all you need to know to make just the right choice!

1. Empire Line
The empire cut dress has a high waistline which usually begins just beneath the bust. This is teamed with a long, full skirt that flows straight from this waistline. The empire style is perfect for a pear shape or thick waist as it skims and hides the bottom half. It also creates an illusion of height for short or petite figures. The empire line vintage dress tends to be from the early to late seventies in an eclectic mix of plain bold or vividly printed flowing fabrics.

2. Sheath/Fitted
A sheath is a slim dress with very little fabric detail that hugs your curves in all the right places and outlines the silhouette of your body. The sheath is perfect for sleeveless styles and is great for showing off a well-toned body. Fitted sheath dresses are especially beautiful and graceful on tall, thin figures. It is most common to find a vintage sheath dress or vintage fitted dress from the eighties in fabrics such as velvet, satin and lycra.

3. The Mini
The mini dress has seen a real resurgence in the past few years. Short and sexy, the strapless version of this dress is probably the most popular of all the vintage party dresses, often referred to as the vintage prom dress. More recently the mini prom dress has been seen in bright candy colours like lime green, fuchsia pink and canary yellow. Great for petite figures with a great pair of legs and can be found in any decent vintage collection in a range of different styles and prints. Look out for eighties tulip and puffball skirts and mini mod sixties dresses with extra detail.

4. The Princess Gown
The princess gown has a form-fitted bodice that flares out from the natural waist to a full and bellowing skirt. This type of gown features a seamless waist and may also be called a a-line gown. The gently flared style flatters most figure types and is especially useful for disguising large hips and thighs. The vintage princess gown is typical of the late sixties and early seventies, at it's best in wistful pastel chiffons or Grecian golds.

5. The Tea Dress
The tea-length dress is hemmed to end just at the shin. It has a fun, flirty appearance that is perfect for a slightly casual or more relaxed function. This dress style is ideal if your calves are your best feature or you have a tall, top heavy figure. The vintage tea dress is usually from the fifties and comes with or without sleeves. Look out for hem detailing and super cute ditsy floral and polka dot prints. Avoid the wrap dress in this length as this is really more for day wear.

6. The Uneven Hem
The uneven hem party dress is also known as a high-low gown. This dress is hemmed long at the back (at the ankles or to the floor) and just above the knees at the front. Other variants include a hem that is longer at one side than the other or one that is frayed to give a real glam peasant look. This is a unique, sexy party dress which is perfect for showing off long legs and an hourglass figure. The vintage uneven hem dress will almost always be from the eighties, for the bold amongst you there is always a great animal print version to find, other may prefer a little black number with some metallics or gem detailing.

7. The Bouffant Gown
A bouffant gown is characterised by a sheer, puffed-out skirt often made from stiffened net, nylon or silk. The skirt of this type of gown is similar in fabric construction (but not necessarily in length) to a ballerina tutu. The flared skirt is perfect for disguising a bottom-heavy figure and a shorter version can give your legs real pride of place. This is an eighties classic, you will find a fabulous array of vintage party dresses with bouffant skirts in any vintage shop or website. Long or short, the bouffant dress can come in a whole rainbow of different colours and patterns, often with puff sleeves to boot!

8. The Ball Gown
The ball gown is highly elegant and always dramatic.  A full skirt that begins at the natural waist and proceeds to floor length. The waist is seamed and may be styled in various shapes and designs. The ball gown style visually cuts the body in half and is ideal for taller figures. The vintage ball gown will never be understated. Look to the eighties for a vast selection of styles from bottle green satin to gold and silver metallics and from oversize corsages to dusky pink taffeta.

So there you have it, a comprehensive guide to all that's fab about vintage party dresses! Now just how are you going to choose? As with all vintage clothing, don't be afraid to experiment with colours, shapes and styles that you would not normally choose. You may just find the perfect party look is right around the corner!

Copyright 2010/2011, My Vintage. May be reprinted in its entirety with full credit given to My Vintage and a link to www.myvintage.co.uk.